Fontal dementia

March 2017


Definition


Frontal or frontal-temporal dementia are conditions that will lead to early cognitive disorders affecting behavior, mood and speech before later on affecting cognitive functions. They are anatomically associated with the degeneration of certain areas of the brain (frontal lobe, parietal lobe). They represent 5-10% of degenerative dementias. The subject affected will gradually lose his capabilites, particularly in language.

Symptoms


The symptoms of the disease will differ from person to person and also according to the progression of the disease stage. The symptoms are not the same depending on whether they are found at the beginning or at a more advanced stage of dementia.
The symptoms are typically represented by:
  • behavioral problems: instability, disinhibition, irritability, difficult controlling of emotions;
  • mood swings with heightened emotions, sadness or otherwise exaltation;
  • physical neglect;
  • loss of interest, isolation, apathy.

Diagnosis


The diagnosis is suspected by a physician and made by a neurologist or neuropsychiatrist. It is based on a series of tests that assess the cognitive functions of the person. It also allows the evaluation of the progression/stage of the disease. The diagnosis can be confirmed by imaging, namely CT or MRI.

Treatment


The treatment of these conditions will be based on their symptoms: mood stabilizers, for example, coupled with work on the conservation and maintenance of cognitive functions.
Eventually, patients lose their autonomy and cannot live alone without endangering themselves. Living in an institution is then a practical solution. Support for people with dementia is achieved with the help of a multidisciplinary team: physicians, psychiatrists, caregivers, nurses ...

Related

Original article published by . Translated by Jeff.
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