Angioma

January 2017


Definition


An angioma is a malformation caused by the excessive production of blood vessels (hemangioma) or lymph nodes (lymphangioma) that dilate too much. This defect results in one or many red spots, more or less dark appearing on the skin tissue, but can also affect organs such as the liver or brain. The term "birthmark" is sometimes used to refer to an angioma that is present at birth. Angiomas are generally isolated and have no clinical significance, aside from aesthetic, and they do not tend to disappear spontaneously. As to infant hemangiomas, they appear soon after birth, increase in size during the first 6 to 12 months and tend to disappear before adolescence. These marks usually do not cause any pain to the child and are not an indication of complications, but sometimes worry parents because of aesthetic aspects.

Symptoms


There are several kinds of angiomas such as cavernous angiomas or spider veins ... All are not necessarily visible, but share the common the fact of being due to a malformation of blood or lymph vessels. They come in the form of marks, non-malignant tumors, and for the most part pose no threat.

Diagnosis


Angiomas such as those called "birthmarks can be seen with the naked eye

Related

Original article published by . Translated by Jeff. Latest update on June 4, 2013 at 01:45 PM by Jeff.
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