Little's disease

May 2017


Definition


Little's disease (or syndrome), also called "spastic diplegia" or "diplegia ligament", is a childhood neurological disorder. It is initially due to the impairment of the brain and is part of a group of childhood diseases called encephalopathies: children affected by such diseases are said to have cerebral palsy or BMI. Little's syndrome occurs in these children from their first months of life, often those born prematurely or who suffered from complications during childbirth, such as a lack of blood supply to the brain or suffocation. Little's disease is characterized by, more or less, a paralysis of the lower limbs, sometimes affecting the upper limbs, which when constant, doesn't improve, but doesn't worsen either.

Symptoms


Little's syndrome may occur with one or more of the following symptoms:
  • stiffness of the lower limbs or upper limbs;
  • abnormal movements of the limbs at rest;
  • muscle spasms;
  • reduced mobility;
  • difficulty in achieving movements;
  • intelligence is generally impaired, but sometimes unaffected;
  • often abnormalities such as urinary disorders, difficulty in chewing and articulation;
  • abnormal growth with bone deformities.

Diagnosis


The diagnosis of Little's syndrome may be suspected during the first months of a child's life. However, diagnosis can be made after the age of one year in children who show the anomalies mentioned above. The objective of an examination is to identify the characteristics of the syndrome. The circumstances of the birth and the end of pregnancy are an integral part of the diagnosis.

Treatment


Brain cells are irreplaceable. Little's syndrome has no cure, because the injuries sustained at birth are irreversible. There are, however, ways to make life less difficult for the child through specialized support to enhance his autonomy.

Related

Original article published by . Translated by Jeff. Latest update on July 1, 2013 at 01:16 PM by Jeff.
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