Pityriasis of the scalp

July 2017


Definition


Pityriasis is a condition affecting the skin, characterized by the presence of desquamation (loss of the surface layer of the skin in the form of dander, small pieces of dead skin). It can affect different areas of the body, including the scalp. In the case of dandruff, a fungal infection caused by a fungus is often the cause. It is characterized by the presence of dandruff on the scalp. Very common (it affects one in three) and benign, this disease can still be a nuisance from an aesthetic point of view.

Symptoms


Dandruff on the scalp is due to the phenomenon of accelerated scaling, caused by tinea. This results in abundant and visible loss (including shoulders) of very thin slices of dead skin (called dander) from the surface layer of the epidermis. White or gray in color, these flakes can be dry or oily (in which case they are more difficult to remove). They also leave no trace or redness on the scalp, and rarely cause itching.

Diagnosis


Dandruff in hair has many possible causes, and a dermatologist will identify pityriasis through a clinical examination of the scalp, and if necessary perform a biopsy or a mycological analysis.

Treatment


There are many specific shampoos and lotions to use regularly to prevent dandruff. These must contain anti-dandruff agents, which include especially zinc pyrithione or selenium sulfide. An antifungal treatment (against fungi) is sometimes not enough, and it is advisable to make an appointment with a dermatologist if the flakes continue to proliferate.

Prevention


It's all about hair care treatment: choose suitable shampoos (especially depending on the state of the flakes, if they are dry or oily) to use regularly (every two days on average). Make sure especially to rinse thoroughly.

Related

Original article published by . Translated by Jeff. Latest update on July 23, 2013 at 11:24 AM by Jeff.
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