Gonorrhea

February 2017


Definition


Gonorrhea, also known more colloquially as the "clap", is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacterium. It is an infection of the genito-urinary organs, and can be contracted by various types of contacts: vaginal, oral and anal. Gonorrhea is sometimes spread by bacteria carried by individuals who themselves suffer no symptoms. The most affected group is generally young adults.

Symptoms


The symptoms of gonorrhea appear after dormant period of a few days.
In men it is manifested by:
  • a flow of whitish or yellowish fluid from the urethra;
  • an intense burning sensation during urination (micturition);
  • it should be noted that in the absence of adequate treatment, effects can worsen up to the point of infertility.

The symptoms are sometimes very intense in women, which can delay the diagnosis of gonorrhea:
  • mild pain or burning during urination;
  • vaginal blood flow;
  • Pain during sexual intercourse;
  • In the absence of treatment, the effects may progress to fertility problems.

Diagnosis


In the absence of clinical signs, gonorrhea can be detected by a genital culture, taken at the urethra in men and the vagina in women. Sometimes a comprehensive test is prescribed to identify any other potential STDs, especially since it is common to encounter cross-infection.

Treatment


Gonorrhea can be treated with antibiotics. A treatment given all at once will quickly interrupt the disease's infectiousness. This treatment can be administered by injection or orally. A treatment against the "Chlamydia" germ that often accompanies gonorrhea will often be administered as well. The subject is asked to refrain from sexual intercourse during treatment and inform their partners to also take a preventive treatment.

Prevention


Condom use and a very good personal hygiene are essential.

Related

Published by Jeff. Latest update on June 5, 2013 at 04:20 AM by Jeff.
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