Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis

December 2016


Definition


Chronic prostatitis is a common disease in male adults, defined as the inflammation of the prostate gland. It may be related to a bacterial infection, the case of acute prostatitis. Sometimes, however, it can also last longer: it is called chronic prostatitis and the exact cause is often difficult to identify. Chronic prostatitis sometimes occurs after the onset of acute prostatitis. A bacterium is thus highlighted nearly in one out of five cases.

Symptoms


Symptoms of chronic prostatitis are:
  • pain in the genitals or pelvis;
  • a urination disorder with a weak stream, delayed initiation of urination, drops, longer urination time, more frequent urination;
  • erectile dysfunction;
  • occasionally, painful ejaculations;
  • lower abdominal pain.

Diagnosis


The diagnosis of chronic prostatitis requires palpation of the prostate through the rectum during a rectal examination. Prostate cancer is often painless, consistent and normal in size. In case of abnormalities, a measuring of the prostate specific antigen and a prostate biopsy should be performed to eliminate any doubt regarding a cancerous origin. Bacteriological samples are also taken in the search for potentially infectious germs.

Treatment


The treatment of chronic nonbacterial prostatitis consists of anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics, possibly herbal medicine, and plenty of rest. A partial resection of the prostate, endoscopically, may be possible if symptoms persist. If there is bacteria, antibiotics are used.

Prevention


Some measures related to treatment of chronic prostatitis also have preventive aspects: spicy foods, coffee and alcohol should be avoided, as should wearing tight clothing and cycling.

Related

Published by Jeff. Latest update on July 23, 2013 at 11:35 AM by Jeff.
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